Archival Storage Chambers – AR Series

The Darwin Chambers AR series is designed specifically for the needs of archival preservation. This series is capable of providing long-term controlled storage of photographs, film, rare books, papers, and paintings. Utilizing a simple precisely controlled refrigeration system and advanced desiccant-based dehumidification, temperatures are maintained to within ±0.2ºC (at the sensor) and relative humidity to within ±1% (at the sensor).

Not only is this series of chambers perhaps the most precise, but they are also exceptionally energy efficient for the high performance they offer. Typical uses and temperature ranges the AR series is capable of providing are solution as follows:

Books, papers, and paintings: 10ºC (50ºF), 30% RH
Film,photographs, microfilm: 1.7ºC (35ºF), 35% RH

The above settings are somewhat typical, but there are many different desired set-points, depending upon the nature of the preserved media.
Anywhere within the range of 0ºC to 25ºC (32ºF to 77ºF). Relative humidity can be controlled at any percentage from 10% to 60%, within an allowed dew-point range of -12ºC to ambient. The standard chambers do not include humidification (this can be added as an option for unusual applications), as they are normally not needed to maintain lowered dew-points.

Check out this awesome website that goes into a little more detail about preservation basics and the vinegar syndrome: National Film Preservation Foundation.

AR030

AR030

The AR030 is a single-door archival storage chamber.

AR055

AR055

The AR055 is a two-door archival storage chamber.

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AR Series Features

Why Choose The AR Series

The AR series chambers are a top selling archival storage chamber. It is quiet, easy to clean, highly reliable and ideal for laboratory use. It offers hot gas bypass control of refrigeration and resistive heat to facilitate reliable, critical temperature and humidity control. The Darwin Chambers AR series is designed specifically for the needs of archival preservation. This series is capable of providing long-term controlled storage of photographs, film, rare books, papers, and paintings. Utilizing a simple precisely controlled refrigeration system and advanced desiccant-based dehumidification, temperatures are maintained to within ±0.2ºC (at the sensor) and relative humidity to within ±1% (at the sensor). Not only is this series of chambers perhaps the most precise, but they are also exceptionally energy efficient for the high performance they offer. Typical uses and temperature ranges the AR series is capable of providing a solution for are as follows:

Books, papers, and paintings: 10ºC (50ºF), 30% RH
Film, photographs, microfilm: 1.7ºC (35ºF), 35% RH

(The above settings are somewhat typical, but there are many different desired set-points, depending upon the nature of the preserved media.) The AR series chambers allow exceptional temperature control anywhere within the range of 0ºC to 25ºC (32ºF-77ºF). Relative humidity can be controlled at any percentage from 10% to 60%, within an allowed dew-point range of -12ºC to ambient. The standard chambers do not include humidification (they can be added as an option for unusual applications), as they are normally not needed to maintain lowered dew-points.

Services and Warranties

We offer technical support throughout the lifetime of your chamber. In addition to standard warranties, we also offer extended warranties for cooling components, parts and labor. We also provide qualifications, validations and preventive maintenance services at an additional cost. Please ask for a quote.

The Darwin Solution

These chambers incorporate an innovative dryer control system that maximizes performance while lowering energy requirements and increasing reliability. In contrast to existing control systems that cycle dehumidification systems on and off, decreasing life span and causing erratic control, the Darwin solution accurately modulates the dryer output, maximizing reliability and producing tight control.

Widely Proven, Non-Proprietary Controllers

Standard controllers for the AR Series are manufactured by Fuji Electric and are ideal for archival storage chambers Unlike many proprietary controllers, this controller is commercially available and proven in tens of thousands of installations. Standard functions include: autotuning, fuzzy logic, PID control, programmable alarms, calibration capability, ramp/soak, offset capability, etc. A touchscreen control interface is optional. Other controller manufacturers are also supported (Watlow, Allen Bradley etc.)

Options Available

Extended Temperature Range
Chart Recorders
Data Loggers
Online System Monitoring
Tracelock
Touch Screen Control
Dryers

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Archival Storage Chambers

What Are the Top Benefits of Archival Storage Chambers?

Storing valuable artwork, film, books, and other materials requires measures that ensure longevity and reliance. We provide a number of services to make sure your items are secure and able to be handled, transferred, or studied when necessary. Our core features include:

  • Temperature and Humidity Control: Building archival storage chambers that maintain precise temperature and humidity levels that are crucial for preserving delicate documents and artifacts.
  • Protection from Environmental Hazards: These chambers shield items from fluctuations in humidity, UV radiation, pollutants, and contaminants. This includes consistent (regulated) air circulation.
  • Longevity and Degradation Prevention: Controlled environments slow down any natural degradation processes. Common signs include yellowing paper and faded ink.
  • Compliance with Preservation Standards: Archival storage chambers meet stringent standards set by cultural heritage organizations and regulatory bodies.
  • Security and Access Control: Most chambers feature advanced security measures to protect stored materials from theft and damage.
  • Customization and Flexibility: Chambers can be customized to accommodate various materials. This includes photographs, paintings, paper, books, film, woodwork, and other items.

Who Would Need an Archival Storage Chamber?

Archival storage chambers are used in a number of different industries across the board with various applications. Common use-cases include the following:

  • Media archives for libraries, museums, and other media-based organizations that want to preserve manuscripts, photos, cloth, metallics, audio recordings, tapes, and other media.
  • Art collectors often use storage chambers to secure and maintain antiques, artifacts, paintings, and other cultural items.
  • When you're studying or producing biological samples, you might use an archival chamber for delicate materials that require certain environments (temperature, humidity, etc.).
  • Records (personal, banking, medical, etc.) are another common thing to store in archival chambers. While many of these items are back up for historically important documents, you can use an archival storage chamber as a sort of safe for things that need to be temperature and humidity controlled.
  • The government uses high-quality archival storage for documents, blueprints, and other important documents.
  • Digital data storage is of growing importance. This includes hard drive and other digital storage devices for both public and private sectors. We make sure your records are safe and retrievable.

People also use archival storage chambers for personal artifacts and other precious goods (journals, deeds, and antiques).

How Can I Safely Store and Secure Items in an Archival Storage Chamber?

Here are a few security features built in to our archival chambers that reduce digital tampering and physical theft:

  • Access Control: Implement strict access control measures to limit entry to authorized personnel only. Use electronic keypads, biometric scanners, or RFID card systems to regulate access to the storage chamber.
  • Surveillance Systems: Install surveillance cameras inside and outside the storage chamber to monitor activity and deter unauthorized access or tampering. Ensure that the camera footage is regularly reviewed and stored securely.
  • Intrusion Detection: Utilize intrusion detection systems, such as motion sensors or door/window alarms, to alert security personnel of any unauthorized entry attempts or suspicious activity.
  • Environmental Monitoring: Implement environmental monitoring systems to continuously track temperature, humidity, and other environmental conditions within the storage chamber. Set up alarms to notify staff of any deviations from preset parameters that could potentially damage stored items.
  • Fire Suppression Systems: Install fire suppression systems, such as sprinklers, fire extinguishers, or gaseous suppression systems, to quickly suppress any fires that may occur within the storage chamber. Regularly inspect and maintain these systems to ensure their effectiveness.
  • Physical Security Measures: Robust door locks, reinforced walls, and shatterproof glass help reinforce security measures.
  • Regular Maintenance: Conduct regular maintenance checks on all security systems and equipment to ensure they are functioning properly. Schedule routine inspections and servicing by qualified technicians to address any issues promptly.
  • Staff Training: Provide comprehensive training to staff members responsible for accessing, monitoring, and maintaining the archival storage chamber. Ensure they are familiar with security protocols, emergency procedures, and proper handling techniques for stored items.
  • Disaster Preparedness: Develop and regularly review a comprehensive disaster preparedness plan that outlines procedures for responding to emergencies such as fires, floods, or natural disasters. Include evacuation routes, emergency contacts, and protocols for salvaging and recovering items from the storage chamber.

By implementing these security measures and protocols, you can significantly enhance the security and safety of items stored in an archival storage chamber, safeguarding them against theft, damage, and environmental hazards.

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